Is it an Emergency?

There are too many urgent conditions to list here, so please use the following information as a guide. 

If you are ever in doubt about your pets' health, please call us day, or night, for advice.

 

Our friendly and trained reception team will be able to advise you over the phone, and will speak to our vets and nurses immediately if your pet has a serious injury or condition.

 

We would prefer you to call us if you are worried about a change in your pets behaviour, you know your pet better than anyone, and you may have picked up on a early sign of a serious problem.

We advise that you call us immediately if your pet has/is: 

  • A road traffic accident (RTA) - even if your pet looks ok on the surface, they may have internal damage (e.g. to their spleen or bladder) 

  • Collapsed - unable to walk or get up by themselves or with encouragement 

  • A wound that is bleeding and won't stop

  • A dog bite to the chest or abdomen - puncture wounds are small, but can damage internal organs such as the lungs 

  • Closed eyelid that your pet won't open

  • Unable to bear weight on a leg - this could be a fracture

  • A seizure/fit that has not stopped within a couple of minutes

  • Eaten a toxic substance - e.g. human medication, rat poison, lilies, mushrooms in the garden, chocolate, raisins/grapes

  • Loss of consciousness 

  • Rapid breathing

  • Pale gums

  • Weak or rapid pulse

  • Vomiting that doesn't stop

  • Bloat - owners of large breed dogs know to look out for GDV signs

  • Unable to urinate - this may look like constipation, so please call us, as a blocked bladder can be fatal within hours

  • Falling over - dogs and cats don't lose their balance unless there is a serious problem going on 

  • Sudden loss of use of hind legs 

  • Gagging/unable to breathe

  • Bulging eye/eyes

  • Swollen face - often as a result of allergy or a bee/wasp sting

  • Coughing up blood/nose bleed 

  • Burns

  • An exposed bone - e.g. toes or tail

  • Vocalising, barking, or appearing distressed can be a sign of pain

Your pet will need to be seen as soon as possible as an emergency case

Please remember that a normally friendly pet may become aggressive if they are injured. Take care, and approach your pet quietly and slowly.

 

We advise that you call us urgently if your pet has:

  • More than 5 episodes of vomiting in 24 hours

  • Diarrhoea in a puppy/kitten or an older dog/cat 

  • Sudden increase or decrease in drinking

  • Loss of appetite

  • Sudden onset limping

  • A sudden change in behaviour e.g. very quiet or very excited/anxious

  • Bloody diarrhoea

Your pet will need to be seen the same day as an urgent case

Please don't leave your pet if you are concerned about them.

 

If you have detected that something isn't right, then call us to discuss it.

 

It may be nothing to be worried about, or you may have seen a subtle early sign of a potentially life-threatening problem.

©chertseyvets 2019